Call for Papers

Special Issue: Transnational Feminisms (due May 15, 2014)

Special Issue: The ERA in the 21st Century (due December 1, 2014)

Special Issue: Women Digitizing Revolution: Race, Gender and the Technological Turn (due May 1, 2015)

NWSA Women of Color Caucus Student Essay Award

**Please note that we continue to accept general submissions on a continual basis, even as we issue calls for special issue papers

A Special Issue of Frontiers: A Journal of Women’s Studies

Transnational Feminisms

Due date for Receipt of Papers is May 15, 2014

Note: Information on the Transnational Feminisms Summer Institute. The deadline for submission of papers for the Institute (which have already been accepted) is May 31st.  If Institute participants wish to have their papers considered for publication in this special issue, they should submit them by email to frontiers@osu.edu by May 15.

Call for Papers:  Frontiers: A Journal of Women's Studies invites submissions for a special issue on transnational feminism and its impact on Women’s Studies as a field.  With this special issue, we commemorate the 40th anniversaryof the first United Nations World Conference on Women that took place in Mexico City in 1975. In the forty years since, transnational feminisms, Native and indigenous feminisms, and women of color feminisms have troubled the idea of a global sisterhood while also providing tools to navigate the global realities of our contemporary societies. 

Despite the important theoretical and practical interventions mobilized by transnational feminisms, its sedimentation has also produced new challenges. Rather than producing complex analyses of gendered, racialized geo-political relationships, transnational feminisms are now, at times, used to justify the imposition of U.S. and European political-economic systems. Might feminists reclaim the initial promises of transnational feminism to intervene in the global economic system or is western feminism subject to reproducing western narratives of progress?  Is transnational feminism’s co-optation the result of U.S. Women’s Studies programs seeking to justify their contributions to universities’ globalizing missions?  Can we imagine a global Women’s Studies approach that unsettles not only second wave internationalist narratives but also contemporary western-centered transnational feminist narratives?

This special issue asks feminist scholars to engage these questions and to explore alternatives. What other definitions of transnational feminism are at work, based in struggles for self-definition and decolonization internationally?  How might Native feminisms force a reconsideration of feminist assumptions, and how might transnational feminist theory contribute to this reconceptualization? What would U.S. feminism look like if it began not with the United States’ mythical democratic origins, as Andrea Smith suggests, but with transnational dynamics of empire and sovereign struggle?  How can we use existing interrogations of imperialism and late capitalism to ask new questions and imagine new ways of resisting and confronting contemporary global and local realities? To this end, we also ask contributors to consider: how do feminists theorize men’s and women’s relationships to postcolonial landscapes, as well as neoliberal and newly colonized geographies? What theories contribute to coalition building across real differences and national borders? 

We seek to provoke a productive conversation that draws upon theories of intersectionality, Native feminisms, women of color feminisms, and transnational feminisms in this special issue of Frontiers. We hope to explore how the theoretical contributions in these areas speak to contemporary globalization in a neoliberal era.   Selected contributors may be invited to workshop their articles, contingent upon funding.

Guest Editorial Collective based at Arizona State University:
Karen J. Leong, Associate Professor, Women and Gender Studies

Roberta Chevrette, PhD student, Communication

Ann Hibner Koblitz, Professor, Women and Gender Studies

Karen Kuo, Assistant Professor, Asian Pacific American Studies

Charles T. Lee, Assistant Professor, Justice Studies

Heather Switzer, Assistant Professor, Women and Gender Studies

An inter- and multidisciplinary journal, Frontiers welcomes submissions of scholarly papers, activist essays as well as creative works such as artwork, fiction, and poetry.  Works must be original and not published or under consideration for publication elsewhere.  All special issue submissions and questions should be directed to  frontiers@osu.edu.  For submission guidelines, please consult the Ohio State University Frontiers websites:  http://frontiers.osu.edu/submissions.


A Special Issue of Frontiers: A Journal of Women’s Studies
The ERA in the 21st Century
Guest Editor: Laura Mattoon D’Amore, Assistant Professor, American Studies
Due date for receipt of papers is December 1, 2014


The failure of the Equal Rights Amendment links generations of feminists across nearly a century of activism.  In 1923, Alice Paul introduced the Equal Rights Amendment to Congress for the first time, demanding equality of rights under the law, regardless of sex. The amendment was introduced unsuccessfully to every Congress since 1923. Though it became a central rallying point for Second Wave feminism, passing both houses of Congress in 1972, it ultimately failed to receive enough state ratifications before its deadline in 1982. Despite its repeated failure the ERA has served as a symbolic torch carried by generations of feminists fighting for women’s rights.

The ERA serves as a conduit for critical dialogues about equal rights, because while the cultural, legal, political, and intellectual heritage of the United States is rooted in the “self-evident” precept of equality, it has prevented the ratification of the Equal Rights Amendment for 90 years.  Furthermore, the topic of the ERA sometimes alienates supporters of equal rights who criticize its complicity in marginalizing race, class, gender, and sexuality through its heteronormative focus on women’s rights. The subject of the ERA has also caused some intergenerational conflict. Some activist feminists who have been working on the ERA for decades—who were in the trenches when it failed in 1982—believe that they have a more true idea of the significance of the loss.  Other activist feminists see the amendment as less relevant today than ever before, and are ready to rally efforts in other spaces.  Academics are highly critical of the political, economic, and legal shortcomings of the past, of the failure to unite in the present, and of the ways that the rhetoric of women’s equality that is so tightly intertwined with the ERA is, in turn, marginalizing others (particularly in terms of its lack of connection to intersections of race, class, gender identity, and sexuality).

This Special Issue about The ERA in the 21st Century seeks to bring together an interdisciplinary array of scholars from such academic disciplines as women’s, gender, and sexuality studies, American studies, history, law, literature, and political science with practitioners from the legal and political professions and activists from grassroots organizations to discuss the proposed Equal Rights Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.  Proposals may explore past, present, and future implications of the fact that the ERA is still not in the Constitution, 90 years after it was first proposed in 1923, and consider how the ERA’s legacy in the 20th century positions the amendment in the popular, social, political, and legal consciousness of the 21st century. Using the ERA as a frame for dialogues across academic, legal, political, and public spheres, this call for papers especially encourages perspectives that engage with theories of, and/or experiences with intersectionality.

Some questions for consideration might include: How has the ERA served to bond feminists in a common struggle? Divide them? Why should the United States add an Equal Rights Amendment to the Constitution?  Is it needed to achieve equal rights without regard to sex?  Would it have any demonstrable negative cultural/legal impact?    What does the failure thus far to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment indicate about the relative cultural/political status and valuation of females in the U.S. since 1923? How have cultural and/or political relationships evolved since 1923 regarding the Equal Rights Amendment and feminism?  Men, both as individuals and as a class?  ERA supporters and opponents, past and present? How has the Equal Rights Amendment been related legally and politically to reproductive rights?  LGBTQ issues?  Trans issues? Racial equality? Economic policies?  Employment rights?  Traditional gender roles and conservative “family values”? What comparisons and contrasts can be drawn between the social and political movement for the Equal Rights Amendment and the movement for racial justice/civil rights?  For reproductive rights?  For LGBTQ rights?  What do these movements have to learn from each other?   In what ways do people continue to engage with the Equal Rights Amendment in academia?  Legal and political practice?  Grassroots advocacy?  What models exist or can be formulated for bridging these categories of engagement?

An inter- and multidisciplinary journal, Frontiers welcomes submissions of scholarly papers, activist essays as well as creative works such as artwork, fiction, and poetry.  Works must be original and not published or under consideration for publication elsewhere.  All special issue submissions and questions should be directed to frontiers@osu.edu.  For submission guidelines, please consult the Ohio State University Frontiers websites:  http://frontiers.osu.edu/submissions.

 

Special Issue: Women Digitizing Revolution: Race, Gender and the Technological Turn
Guest Editors: Anna Everett and Lisa Nakamura
Due date, May 1, 2015


Frontiers invites your submission to our special issue on women and technology. It is difficult to realize that it has been more than twenty years since such groundbreaking texts as Donna Haraway’s Simians, Cyborgs, and Women: The Reinvention of Nature (1991), Susan M. Squier’s Babies in Bottles: Twentieth-Century Visions of Reproductive Technology (1994), Anne Balsamo’s Technologies of the Gendered Body: Reading Cyborg Women (1995), Sherry Turkle’s Life on the Screen: Identity in the Age of the Internet (1997) and other publications that changed the discursive contours of science and technology studies both inside and outside the academy.  As Frontiers guest editors we are grappling with the “time passages” (to quote George Lipsitz) that have lapsed between the 2002 publications of our own interventionist works focusing on race and technology, namely, Lisa Nakamura’s book Cybertypes: Race, Ethnicity and Identity on the Internet (2002), and Anna Everett’s “The Revolution Will Be Digitized: Afrocentricity and the Digital Public Sphere” (in a 2002 special edition of the Social Text journal).  

In the intervening years and decades, technological developments and innovations have transformed our cultures and societies in such fundamental ways that new feminist and critical race studies must reckon with our increasingly technologized everyday lives and knowledge regimes seem in order. For example, when Haraway warned us about women of color’s outsourced sweatshop labor in the computing industries in developing and underdeveloped countries, and Squire alerted us to the ways that masculinist patriarchal institutions wrest away women’s reproductive power and agency through technology and politics, women and some men recognized the need to become engaged and activist scholars around need for interrogating the dangers and benefits of technological progress. In addition, Balsamo and Turkle pushed us to consider the representational economies and narratives of gender in screen cultures in the internet age. As usual, we add the double-oppression problematic (where women of color are oppressed simultaneously by race and gender) to this persistent societal bias where opportunities and contributions of women and technology mesh.

And while contemporary technological discourses and scientific knowledge production are legible to lay readers as well as tech insiders as a result of our indebtedness to the foundational works above, the speed and pervasiveness of technological advances require new, and timely hermeneutics for addressing today’s concerns where women, race, gender, sexuality, (dis)ability and technology collide (particularly in our so-called “post-feminist” and “post-racist” eras) designed for the twenty-first century going forward.  Frontiers aims to add fresh voices and ideas to conversations about women’s roles and places in say, technology, education reform, and the MOOCs debate, reaching girls in K-12 STEM projects, gender, race, and sexualities in the digital humanities (DH) and big data programs, and what new interactive technologies mean for women in our pursuits of participatory democracy equity. This special issue of Frontiers is not only interested in scrutinizing the persistent and ongoing gender divide in technology, but we also understand the need to highlight and recognize women’s proactive and interventionist activities already underway as they represent best practices for how women scholars and independent technology workers collaborate today to make technological shifts and changes responsive and accountable to women and girls on our own terms.  

Thus we encourage submissions to our call for papers organized around the broad theme of women and technology. We are interested in topics that include but are not limited to:

Women and social media
Biotechnology and the new women’s reproductive rights movement
YouTube Feminism
Feminist media archaeology and women as technological innovators
Feminism and Online learning
“Lean In” Feminism: Labor, Time, and the Gendering of the Digital Industries
Feminist Twitter, Black Twitter: Hashtag activism and performativities
Women and the Open-source movement
Feminist digital pedagogy and the conservative backlash against race/gender studies
Women, privacy, surveillance, and mobile technology
Race, feminism, and the digital humanities
Politics, technology and feminist activism
Digital feminism and disability
Gender and serious/learning games

An inter- and multidisciplinary journal, Frontiers welcomes submissions of scholarly papers, activist essays as well as creative works such as artwork, fiction, and poetry.  Works must be original and not published or under consideration for publication elsewhere.  All special issue submissions and questions should be directed to frontiers@osu.edu.  For submission guidelines, please consult the Ohio State University Frontiers websites:  http://frontiers.osu.edu/submissions.

NWSA announces Women of Color Caucus- Frontiers Student Essay Award
Beginning in 2014, Women of Color Caucus prize winning essays will automatically be considered for publication by Frontiers: A Journal of Women’s Studies (http://frontiers.osu.edu/). The purpose of the National Women’s Studies Association (NWSA) Women of Color Caucus-Frontiers Student Essay Awards is to discover, encourage, and promote the intellectual development of emerging scholars who engage in critical theoretical discussions and/or analyses about feminist/womanist issues concerning women and girls of color in the United States and the diaspora.  Please see submission details for the Women of Color Caucus awards as well as other NWSA awards and prizes. 

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